Did you know, you can purchase real estate in your retirement account?

purchase real estate in your retirement accountDid you know?

Did you know that you can use your Individual Retirement Account (IRA) can invest in more than stocks and bonds?  IRA’s also can buy real estate (single family, multi-family, commercial, raw land) for investment.

How it Works:

First, you need an IRA custodian that allows investing in “Alternative Assets”.  Once you have found a custodian, such as Mountain West IRA, that allows Self-Directed IRA investing, you can invest in what you know.   When “Self-Directing” all investment decisions are made by you, the IRA owner. The custodian then makes investments on behalf of your IRA. The custodian manages the transaction, the paperwork and the reporting.

Everything needed to fund an IRA investment property must come out of your IRA. Similarly, money that is made from the investment property such as rent, or proceeds from a sale, must be given back to your IRA. So if you purchase a single family home, and rent it out, those proceeds return to your IRA to grow your retirement wealth.

Over time, real estate investments have afforded many people the powerful combination of appreciation and income. The purchase of real estate through a self-directed IRA is a popular choice for that, and other reasons. A self-directed IRA gives you the freedom to invest in single-family and multi-unit homes, apartment buildings, condominiums (leveraged or unleveraged), improved or unimproved land, commercial property, and more.

Want to Know More?

Remember, the more knowledge you have the more helpful you are to potential buyers and sellers – these transactions are something that can help you quickly sell a property!

Investment Types

You should never feel as if your retirement funds might be able to do more outside of your IRA vs inside. Funny concept, when all we have been taught over the years is to invest in the stock market and earn an average return to grow your retirement. Thankfully, Mountain West IRA allows you to invest in what you know best!

Let’s talk about the different options of investments.

Common Investments vs. Alternative Investments

  • Common Investments: Public stocks, bonds, mutual funds. You can open an IRA with almost any financial custodian that you see on TV or at your local bank, and you can have the option to invest in a public stock trading platform.
  • Alternative Assets: Real estate, promissory notes, private companies, or precious metals. YES, you can use your IRA to invest in all of the above. You will not find this type of account at your local bank or big-name financial organization. You will want a company that specializes in self-directed IRA’s with alternative assets. You choose the investment and have the opportunity to invest in what you know. You do Not have to go with a company that offers the same cookie cutter investments as every other company. You can have the freedom of self-direction, where you can build your retirement employing the same tax-deferred or tax-free methods of retirement accounts.

Our favorite thing to hear after a client does their first transaction is, “Why have I not heard about this sooner!” The education is out there. However, you must wade through a swamp of commission-seeking financial advisors to get it. Keep in mind, someone who is only trained in common investments may not be educated in alternative assets.

Diversification is very important when it comes to retirement. This is your future – putting time aside to learn the methods that fits you and your family best are important.

Invest in what you know best! Click the link below that interests you.

Promissory Notes

Real Estate

The Differences Between a Traditional IRA and a Roth IRA

Choosing the correct account for yourself and your family may seem complicated and confusing, but you only have a few options when it comes to how you wish to be taxed. Below we share a comparison between a Traditional IRA vs a Roth IRA.

Traditional vs. Roth

  • Traditional: You may potentially receive a write-off on your taxes for contributions, determined by your household income. The funds then grow tax-deferred by revenue and dividends generated from your investments. Upon retirement age (59.5) you can begin distributing funds from your Traditional IRA without penalty, but this income will be added to your gross household income, so you will have to pay taxes on these funds. You can, if you wish, wait to distribute any funds from your account until 70.5 years old. At that point, the IRS rules say you must begin taking Required Minimum Distributions or RMD’s. This is basically the government’s way of saying, you received a write-off when you put these funds into this account we need to make sure to get our taxes before you pass away. I know, somewhat morbid!
  • Roth: You do NOT receive a write-off on your taxes for contributions. The contributions you make to this account are “after-tax dollars.” However, you will get to grow your retirement money tax-free, forever! Like the Traditional IRA, the funds then grow by revenue and dividends generated from your investments. After age (59.5 and 5 years of the account being opened) you can take a distribution that is both penalty and tax-free. This tax-free distribution increases your NET household income. This is also an excellent choice for an estate planning tool, as you do not have to take any RMD’s, at any age. You have already paid your taxes. You are free to do what you wish with your distributions.

* High-income households: your financial advisor may tell you that you do not qualify for a Roth. There is something called a backdoor conversion that you can contribute to a Traditional and not receive a write-off, then convert the next day to a Roth. There is never a no iif this is the account type you want!

These are the primary differences between Traditional and Roth retirement accounts. There are some other rules that may or may not apply to you depending on your household income. Please speak to a Mountain West IRA representative if you wish to learn more.

Are you interested in learning more? Here is a no cost, no obligation webinar for you to check out: Alternative Asset Allocation Model

How to Double Your Retirement Overnight

The following is a hypothetical model based off of an investors figures he figured on this actual property.

Back in 2007, the average IRA that was transferred to a self-directed IRA was about $200,000. After the crash in 2007-2008. The average value of IRAs decreases to about half, thus putting the current value at $100,000.

We will be walking through this example of a $200,000 IRA in a real-life scenario to show you how you can double your retirement overnight.

The investor purchased a rental property at the height of the market in the name of his IRA. The investor is utilizing a self-directed IRA where he can purchase alternative assets, NOT taking a distribution from your retirement account.

The property was purchased for $180,000 in a self-directed IRA coupled with a non-recourse loan. The investor was able to leverage the funds in his IRA to purchase an investment property.

What the investor had to put down on this property to qualify for a non-recourse loan was $63,000. The remainder was a loan from the bank in the investor’s IRA. The IRA will have a mortgage and a deed of trust that goes inside of the IRA. The investor does not own the property, the IRA does.

The market value on the day that IRA closed on the property increased the value to $217,000. Let’s break down how this happened; $180,000 on the property and $37,000 cash. The day before the value was $100,000.

If you recall the original value before the crash was $200,000, then the market crashed which brought the value of the IRA to $100,000. The current value was able to double overnight by using other people’s money through a non-recourse loan.

When the investor calculated this investment he chooses to calculate the value of the investment now and projected value in the future to determine when and if he would like to sell the property.

The investor projected about a 3% capital appreciation on this property per year. This percentage is based on the market value of the property at the time of purchase ($180,000). The property should make about $5,400 per year and the investor plans on holding this property for 10 years. After 10 years, the capital gain is estimated to be $54,000.

At this point, we are 10 years after the purchase. The investor’s calculations are almost spot on, the calculations fell a little below 3% but has caught up recently. The original idea was to sell this property after 10 years.

The value of the property and cash in the self-directed IRA is now $271,000. Remember, the investor started with only $100,000 in this IRA. You may be saying, “yes, but there is a loan on the property.” You are correct. However, the investor paid more than the minimum of $700 per month on the loan. This property is currently producing $1,350 per month in income. The net income has been about $900 after setting aside money for property taxes, management fees, and repairs that must be paid by the IRA. After 10 years of paying more than the minimum, the balance is now at $40,000. If the property would have been sold at 10 years for the IRA would receive $231,000 – the investors IRA only put $63,000. That is about 30% per year average annual return on this investment in a tax-sheltered self-directed IRA.

Here is a table to show how the IRA doubled overnight:
2007 IRA account value $200,000

 

After crash IRA account value $100,000

 

Investment Property Purchased:
Funds from IRA $63,000

 

Funds from non-recourse mortgage $117,000

 

New value of IRA + Cash Funds $180,000 + $37,000

 

Long-term Investment Calculation*:
Capital Appreciation at 3% times 10 years $54,000

 

10-year appreciation $271,000

 

Loan Payment at $900 per month (-$40,000)

 

IRA Tax Advantages Appreciation $231,000

 

*Estimated by investor, not advice

If you would like to learn more please visit our webinar, Alternative Asset Allocation Model