How to Double Your Retirement Overnight

The following is a hypothetical model based off of an investors figures he figured on this actual property.

Back in 2007, the average IRA that was transferred to a self-directed IRA was about $200,000. After the crash in 2007-2008. The average value of IRAs decreases to about half, thus putting the current value at $100,000.

We will be walking through this example of a $200,000 IRA in a real-life scenario to show you how you can double your retirement overnight.

The investor purchased a rental property at the height of the market in the name of his IRA. The investor is utilizing a self-directed IRA where he can purchase alternative assets, NOT taking a distribution from your retirement account.

The property was purchased for $180,000 in a self-directed IRA coupled with a non-recourse loan. The investor was able to leverage the funds in his IRA to purchase an investment property.

What the investor had to put down on this property to qualify for a non-recourse loan was $63,000. The remainder was a loan from the bank in the investor’s IRA. The IRA will have a mortgage and a deed of trust that goes inside of the IRA. The investor does not own the property, the IRA does.

The market value on the day that IRA closed on the property increased the value to $217,000. Let’s break down how this happened; $180,000 on the property and $37,000 cash. The day before the value was $100,000.

If you recall the original value before the crash was $200,000, then the market crashed which brought the value of the IRA to $100,000. The current value was able to double overnight by using other people’s money through a non-recourse loan.

When the investor calculated this investment he chooses to calculate the value of the investment now and projected value in the future to determine when and if he would like to sell the property.

The investor projected about a 3% capital appreciation on this property per year. This percentage is based on the market value of the property at the time of purchase ($180,000). The property should make about $5,400 per year and the investor plans on holding this property for 10 years. After 10 years, the capital gain is estimated to be $54,000.

At this point, we are 10 years after the purchase. The investor’s calculations are almost spot on, the calculations fell a little below 3% but has caught up recently. The original idea was to sell this property after 10 years.

The value of the property and cash in the self-directed IRA is now $271,000. Remember, the investor started with only $100,000 in this IRA. You may be saying, “yes, but there is a loan on the property.” You are correct. However, the investor paid more than the minimum of $700 per month on the loan. This property is currently producing $1,350 per month in income. The net income has been about $900 after setting aside money for property taxes, management fees, and repairs that must be paid by the IRA. After 10 years of paying more than the minimum, the balance is now at $40,000. If the property would have been sold at 10 years for the IRA would receive $231,000 – the investors IRA only put $63,000. That is about 30% per year average annual return on this investment in a tax-sheltered self-directed IRA.

Here is a table to show how the IRA doubled overnight:
2007 IRA account value $200,000

 

After crash IRA account value $100,000

 

Investment Property Purchased:
Funds from IRA $63,000

 

Funds from non-recourse mortgage $117,000

 

New value of IRA + Cash Funds $180,000 + $37,000

 

Long-term Investment Calculation*:
Capital Appreciation at 3% times 10 years $54,000

 

10-year appreciation $271,000

 

Loan Payment at $900 per month (-$40,000)

 

IRA Tax Advantages Appreciation $231,000

 

*Estimated by investor, not advice

If you would like to learn more please visit our webinar, Alternative Asset Allocation Model 

Reasons People are Delaying Retirement

Not everyone is excited about the prospect of retirement. Some people feel like they are not quite ready financially, or they just will not know what to do with their free time when they retire. Here are three reasons people are delaying their retirement:

  1. Nest Egg Growth

Once the children leave the nest completely, investors generally have more money to put toward their retirement accounts. Some of these investors might want to take advantage of the extra cash flow and continue to contribute to a retirement account past age 62, the average retirement age in the United States. Traditional IRAs allow investors to contribute until they are 70 ½ years of age, giving them an extra 8 ½ years of investing and nest egg growth. With a Roth IRA, investors can continue to contribute even after the age of 70 ½. Making a contribution in any retirement account will require 1099 or W2 income, however it can be 100% of earned income.

  1. Shorter Retirement

Those who are concerned about the size of their nest egg also take into consideration the possible number of years they will need to finance without a steady income stream. Fewer years in retirement means they have less concerns about making the money stretch and can afford to take trips or support their current lifestyle.

  1. Health Insurance

Employees who are lucky enough to have health insurance provided through their employer might be reluctant to give that up for an individual policy. However, with a Health Savings Account this does not have to be an issue. Contributing to an HSA can lower the stress of health costs during retirement. Visit the Mountain West IRA website to learn more about qualifying for a Health Savings Account.

Age of retirement varies for each individual and can have its benefits whether you want to delay it a little bit longer or get started now.  Taking advantage of a self-directed IRA can be beneficial no matter which route you choose. Talk to a professional at Mountain West IRA today to find out more about the accounts, investment options, and the benefits of self-directed IRAs.

Five Threats to Retirement Savings

Saving for retirement does not always go as planned. Retirement savings are subject to threats, both direct and indirect. Some of these threats are just unfortunate circumstances, while others are deliberate actions trying to take advantage of the investor.

  1. Boomerang Children

These are the children of the Boomer Generation that are still being supported by their parents by living at home. According to a study by Hearts & Wallets, only 21 percent of Boomers still supporting their children are fully retired, compared to the 52 percent who are not supporting their children.

To avoid this threat, investors need to teach their children how to properly handle finances and be self-sufficient. This way they are less likely to move back in with their parents due to money issues.

  1. Caring for Parents

As investors’ parents age, they often need help either with personal care or finances. Helping them financially can make it more difficult for the adult child to save for retirement. Also, 25 percent of adult children younger than 65 help parents with chores, personal care, etc. This may lead to less time spent at a paying job, causing them to earn less than they otherwise would earn.

Although difficult to avoid, there are assistance programs and other means for children to help their parents get what they need without sacrificing their time at work.

  1. Spousal Death without Life Insurance

For those who have a mortgage, debt, or children to support, life insurance can be critical. It can also be critical to those in their final years of saving for retirement. The loss of that second income can hit a spouse hard financially, making saving next to impossible.

Spouses should evaluate life insurance options and have a clear plan if something were to happen to one of them.

  1. Medical Crisis

In the US, medical bills are the leading cause of bankruptcy. Those with injuries or a chronic illness might not be able to work, causing investors to dig into savings to pay for medical bills. Long-term care is also very expensive and can derail even the most stable retirement plans.

Health Savings Accounts are one way to battle this issue. With this account, investors can use it to pay qualified medical expenses tax-free at any time.

  1. Scams

There are plenty of people attempting to scam people out of their retirement savings. The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority advises people to be cautious around schemes that promise returns of 12 percent or higher. Often these scammers use early retirement seminars to pitch their strategies.

Being aware of potential threats is the first step to avoiding them. Meeting with a financial planner can also help to address concerns investors might have about their retirement savings. To maximize potential retirement savings, contact Mountain West IRA to learn about their self-directed accounts and investment options.

The Balancing Act

Many younger workers have the task of balancing debt reduction with retirement savings. Often the debt they have accrued is related to student loans and credit cards. Many of these workers believe they need to pay off their debt before they begin actively saving for retirement.

However, to be able to save a sufficient amount for their golden years, young workers are going to need to save while also paying off debt. Here are some ideas on how to do that:

  1. Focus on High Interest Debt

Getting out of high interest debt should be a priority. Credit cards are usually the main culprit with interest rates as high as 18 or even 25 percent. Once rid of high interest credit card debt, try to stay out of it. When these debts are out of the way, there will be more funds available to allocate to retirement savings.

  1. Be Smart with Loans

Often, loans are just a necessary evil in life. This is especially true when making large purchases, such as buying a new car. Try to find the best deal possible, with smaller payments. Sometimes this means buying a used car or a less expensive option. The larger the down payment, the smaller the monthly payments. With smaller payments, more money can be put toward retirement.

  1. Set Realistic Goals

Instead of having an illusion of spending very little in retirement, plan for spending more. The average annual spending for those age 65 and older is $40,938. Workers need to realize they will probably spend more and account for that in their savings.

This is especially true of spending money on healthcare. Many retirees do not account for medical needs when saving. One way to be cognizant of upcoming healthcare costs is to start a health savings account. These accounts help retirees cover the medical costs rather than dipping into their retirement savings.

Often, younger workers are only encouraged to take advantage of a 401(k) match plan through their company. While this is a great tool, opening a separate account in addition to a work-sponsored one can bump up their savings potential. Visit Mountain West IRA’s website to learn about their retirement plans and investment options.