5 Myths About Retirement Plans Everyone Should Know

When it comes to retirement planning and personal finances, people often think they are on the right track. The truth is that most people fail to understand the basic ideas about retirement planning and personal finances. Misinformation and blind spots can undermine how your financial security. Misconceptions can badly affect how you save and prepare for the future. You have every possibility to encounter these misconceptions on a regular basis when working with financial experts. In this content, you will find some myths about retirement plans and savings that everyone should know.

Myth 1: I will go back to work if there are not sufficient retirement funds

The longevity of life is a clear view about this myth. It implies that people can simply continue to work past the normal retirement age of sixty-five, which they can, however do you really want to? It is not a wise plan to depend on employment as one of the methods of financing your retirement years. Earlier than planned retirements are often caused by disabilities and health problems, which may not allow you to go back to work.

Myth 2: In retirement, all my bills will be reduced

Most retirees believe that they will fall into the bracket of reduced tax after retirement. Many soon-to-be retirees believe they will be living on a lower income. Many retiree goals are to maintain their standard of living, however have an increase of income. When you pay off or clear your home debt prior to retirement, it implies that such deduction will not count, however you will decrease your cost of living. Your traditional 401(k) or Traditional IRA will be taxed based on the withdrawals from tax-deferred investments. It is a largely estimated task to determine or figure out what tax rates will be in your retirement years. Speak with a tax professional to plan accordingly.

Myth 3: My health insurance will be taken care of by Medicare

Your health care expenses will not be completely covered even if you are eligible for Medicare. Your largest future expenses will be cascaded on health. Medicare does not cover copayments, deductibles, visits to medical experts, out-of-pocket costs for prescriptions, other expenses such as hearing aids, dental visits and eyeglasses. Many people usually believe that when visiting a nursing center Medicare will provide for them. However, in most cases, this scenario is not correct. If Medicare actually qualifies, then you will only be covered for a limited number of days.

Myth 4: I will need less funds when I retire

The money you will spend during retirement may be much more than when working actively. This scenario is actually noticed in the first couple of years. When you are in retirement, you’ll have more free time to carry out leisure activities, travel, hobbies and other important things. For this reason, you will be spending more on your wants than when you were actively working.

(Potential) Myth 5: My retirement years will be funded by social security

The average retiree’s income is simply covered Social Security for only 38% percent. Retirement plans can be complicated if you do not understand the entire concept. It is important to have a schedule to accumulate your own money. This will help make up the gap between your living costs and Social Security during retirement. For your retirement plans, social security should be considered an additional advantage and not the foundation.

10 Tips to Re-Stress Your Retirement Plans

There is a well-known nursery story about an ant who works hard all his life so that after the rains come he can be secure and guarded with all the provisions he needs. The same lesson is to be exercised while retirement making plans is considered. Effective and efficient retirement planning can be equated to early planning. Planning is the key in order to determine how you will spend the rest of the days. Given below are certain guidelines and strategies that are recognized to be useful to many; it might even help you too.

1. NEVER Withdraw from Your Retirement Plan

Withdrawing money from your retirement plan is never advisable except in the most extreme situations. Withdrawing from your retirement plan will mean losing the valuable interest that has accrued. This will reduce future interest you earn on that account and keep it from building into a larger nest egg. You could face penalties or early withdrawal fees. Some plans allow you to have withdrawals or loans but you must be extra careful in taking advantage of these withdrawals.

2. Invest in YOUR Future

Invest as much money into your company retirement plan for as long as you can afford it. You should invest enough to get your company matching funds if they are offered. Even small amounts can grow into very large amounts over time. A small sacrifice now, can set you up for success in retirement.

3. Monitor the Investments

Always monitor your investments on a regular basis. Only then will you be aware of any discrepancies or unexpected downturns in your plan. You will also be aware of how your investments are doing. Alternative assets may require more attention than traditional investment choices.

4. Social Security

Do not rely too much on social security. You should always have other means of income as a backup. It is wise to have a retirement plan, an IRA, and personal savings. The more streams of income the better, especially in retirement. Have you ever wondered whether the social security system will survive the coming retirement of the baby boom generation? You should think about this and plan accordingly.

5. Separate the Plans

Each family member should plan for their retirement. Often, only one spouse will have a retirement plan, however you can partner your retirement accounts for better retirement investing opportunities. If something were to happen to either spouse and remaining spouse is a primary beneficiary, they can then merge the IRAs to continue cash flow. You will be setting your family up for long-term success if you plan early.

6. Review the Plan

Alternative assets in self-directed IRAs are more geared towards the hands on investor. If you happen to have a low-maintenance investment, always remember to review your portfolio goals. You may not achieve your ultimate success, if you are not reviewing your portfolio outcome. The bottom line is to take your retirement planning efforts seriously, widen your mind for your investments, save regularly, and always keep your goals in mind. That will insure that you enjoy your golden years comfortably!

7. Get Organized

Gather your financial papers, receipts of charitable contributions and proof of the deductions you intend to claim. Sit down, plan your future and work towards it. You cannot aim for a fruitful retirement without a plan to get there.

8. Find Out What is New

Nearly every year there’s something new about the tax codes. Credits, exemptions and deductions can change so ask your tax professional or do some research to find out about what may affect your circumstances. Always be open to second opinions, as this is your future and your money – take control.

9. Know What You Are Doing

Tax forms can be complicated and confusing, but incorrect information can delay your refund or generate IRS penalties. Tax preparation software programs can take out some of the guesswork. If you don’t trust yourself to do your own taxes, consider going to a reputable tax service or a CPA. Always have a meeting to review your documents this way you can guarantee nothing was missed.

10. Safeguard Your Long-Term Financial Records

You will want to save income tax returns and supporting documentation – such as cancelled checks – not less than six years. And it’s important to save your retirement portfolio account papers indefinitely. Year end is a great time to review your financial situation, revisit your asset allocation and retirement portfolio diversification strategies, and do as much as you can to boost your retirement savings.

7 Flaws Most Retirement Plans Have

Despite the constant news coverage of impending doom in regards to social security, many people are still counting on their social security payments to support them through their retirement. The sad fact is that it simply is not possible because the money is not there. Sadder still is the fact that even if the money were there, it is doubtful that it would be enough to get the average person through their twilight years. Here’s why.

1. Your Expected Retirement Costs:

Choosing the right retirement plans should include an evaluation of your expected retirement costs. These costs are different for each person, the ideal plan for your retirement will allow you to save the amount of money that you expect to need once you retire. Some plans may not offer investment options that will provide the return needed to reach the desired account balance. Make sure that you include all potential expenses faced after retirement; otherwise you could choose a plan that falls short.

2. Your Anticipated Plan Contributions Each Year:

The plan that you choose should factor in your yearly expected contributions and ensure that your retirement goals can be achieved. Some plans may limit allowable contributions to a small amount on an annual basis, and some plans may allow catch-up contributions at 50 years old. Keep in mind, a small sacrifice today may greatly benefit you in the future!

3. Tax Planning Advice:

Finding the best retirement plans should include professional tax advice. The consequences of poor retirement planning can be large tax liabilities, at a time when your income is needed the most. Some plans utilize pre-tax contributions that are taxed upon distribution, while other plans use contributions made on a post-tax basis, so withdrawals are not taxed after retirement. Tax advice can help you choose the right plans for all of your retirement needs and goals.

4. A List of Retirement Goals:

Before deciding on the best plan for your financial security during retirement you will need to create a list of your retirement goals. Will you want to travel? Will you keep a second home? Will you work at a part-time job or take up a hobby with related expenses? Your retirement goals will affect the plan for your future, and the amount of retirement income you will need to live on.

5. A Professional Financial Planner:

A financial planner can help you choose the best retirement plans for your unique goals and financial needs at this stage in your life. A financial planner will help you to set financial goals, and then outline steps you need to take so that these goals can be easily met. Always remember this is YOUR retirement account, many financial planners say they have your best interest at heart, however at the end of the day YOU have to live off of this account, not them.

If you are knowledgeable in real estate, promissory notes, precious metals, private companies and you know you can increase your return on investment then do it! Find a financial planner that will encourage you to diversify your portfolio. A smart financial planner will know that encouraging diversification is better than an unhappy client.

6. A Good Retirement Calculator:

A good retirement calculator can help you accurately calculate all of the expenses you will have after you retire. This should be one of the first steps in retirement plans so that you do not end up short on funds in your golden years. These tools can help identify unexpected costs and expense that you may not have considered.

7. Your Annual Income Amount:

Some retirement plans have certain restrictions concerning annual income amounts for eligibility. Many 401K plans, IRA accounts, and other retirement options may not be open to high income earners. Some plans may be intended for small business owners or self-employed individuals, while others are intended for high income employees, and still others may be ideal for low-income wage earners. You will need to know the annual amount that you earn to determine which plan is right for your retirement needs. Speak with your tax-professional to discuss the best option for you.

It is best to begin making these plans as early as possible. It is not impossible to recover from poor planning in your younger years. The sooner you begin making plans for your financial retirement the healthier your retirement options will be. The best way to go about this is to define your retirement goals, make plans, and then take your goals and plans to a financial advisor and get his or her input, then follow your plan. Investing smarter is much wiser than investing harder.

Savings Tips for Millennials

Millennials are struggling to save and pay off student debt at the same time, putting them behind in the retirement savings area. The ones that are managing to save, aren’t saving what experts consider enough. There are some things they can do about it though.

Cut Costs

One of the biggest expenses on Millennials’ plates is housing. Before signing the lease to the really nice apartment with a pool, dishwasher and other extras, take a moment to reconsider. Most people can probably get along just fine without a few of the extra amenities and put the rent savings aside for retirement.

Create a Budget

This goes for everyone, but Millennials should get into the habit of creating a budget early on. Tracking spending can help determine how much money is spent on necessary purchases and how much is spent on extras. After creating a budget, it is easier to put more into a retirement savings account.

Adjusting Savings

Millennials should make it a goal to increase how much they save for three months. This can prove it is possible to save more, with a few lifestyle adjustments. It might mean having to cook at home more than eating out with friends, but it will be worth it later on.

These all seem like fairly easy tips, but putting them into practice is the difficult part. Millennials are in the spot where they’ve begun a career and are probably making more money than before. However, instead of saving the extra, Millennials, like many others of all ages, tend to increase their spending.

The tips listed about can help deter this habit and get Millennials on the right track for retirement savings. For those who haven’t yet set up a retirement savings account, contact Mountain West IRA. They have an option that is right for everyone.

The Lazy Man’s Retirement Plan

At the end of the day, most people just want to relax and turn off their brains. They don’t want to think about their retirement accounts or investments. However, not keeping these things in mind, and making time for them could be detrimental to the future.

With time, life has become about convenience. People want things done fast, and with the least amount of stress possible. Investing and managing money is neither of those things. To get the “lazy person” to invest and save for retirement, it needs to be made simple.

One way to make things simple is to have a certain amount of money pulled out of each paycheck. This way the investor doesn’t have to think about it, the money is automatically put into their retirement account and begins gathering interest.

Open an account outside of work. Mountain West IRA offers many types of retirement accounts for investors to provide investing freedom. For those who don’t have the time to learn to play the stock market, or don’t want to, Mountain West IRA offers other, simpler investing options. They could invest in real estate, precious metals and more.

Start early and let the money continue to grow with interest over the years. This is probably the easiest and simplest way to get money for retirement. However, it might not always be enough, which is why there are other investment options. It might take a little more time and attention, but investing will help beef up retirement savings.

For those interested in opening an account outside of work, contact Mountain West IRA and talk to them about their retirement account options.